Articles Posted in Train Accident

King5.com of Seattle reports that a man was killed by a freight train in Centralia early this morning. The man was crossing the tracks when he was hit by the train.

This is the 10th fatality in Washington state this year involving people who have been hit by trains. Of the 10 deaths, 9 of the people were considered to be trespassers and one was at a pedestrian crossing.

Pedestrians are often ignorant of the dangers that railroad tracks pose. It is often devastating to train engineers to be involved in a collision in which a pedestrian is killed. Pedestrians often don’t realize that trains are traveling at speeds of up to 80 mph and that they can not stop for a pedestrian.

Police are investigating a railroad accident in which a man, who was sitting on the railroad tracks in Sumner, was hit and killed by a northbound Burlington Northern Santa Fe freight train around 12:40am.

Train engineers saw the man sitting on the tracks but were unable to stop the train in time.

This information is provided by Washington Injury Attorney blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in train accidents and the family of those killed.

A woman was hit and killed by a Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp train on Saturday morning around 5:30am.

From a report in The Seattle Times, it seems that the woman may have committed suicide because the train crew saw the woman run from behind a building and into the path of the oncoming train. The train’s engineer tried to stop but the train hit and killed the woman.

The woman has not yet been identified. Police, however, believe they have found the woman’s vehicle nearby.

Two young men from Washington state were killed and a young man and woman were injured when the Chevy Aveo they were riding in apparently went around a railroad crossing arm and were involved in a train vs. car accident in Utah.

According to a report in The Seattle Times, Alex Amundson, 21, of Fariview, and Donald Callison, 18, of Monroe were both killed in the motor vehicle accident. Amundson was driving the vehicle at the time of the accident. The train was estimated to be traveling at 45 mph and 55mph when it hit the Aveo.

Injured in the accident were an 18-year-old female from Salt Lake County and a 19-year-old male from Vernal. Their condition is unknown.

The Seattle Times reports that a 36-year-old Pierce County resident was hit and killed by an Amtrak Train around 2 am this morning.

According to the report, the woman had been missing and was described as suicidal. The report said that the incident did not occur at a railroad crossing and that there were no passengers on the train at the time.

The train was en route to Seattle from Portland at the time of the incident.

Safe Kids.org launched “Safe Crossing Week” for the week of November 1 through November 7 to teach children about how to be safe around railroad crossings. This year’s program is called “Teaching Safety for Life.”

Safe Kids “Top Railroad Safety Rules” for parents to teach their children include:seattle train accident attorney

  • Railroad tracks are dangerous, don’t play around them. Only cross tracks at marked crossings and always look both ways.

Last week, a Northwest Airlines commercial flight overview its destination by 150 miles. Fortunately, this was not a terrorist incident, the pilots were not asleep nor fighting. However, they were very distracted — they were using a laptop computer — and did not notice that it was time to land the plane.

According to The Seattle Times, the pilots Richard Cole of Salem, Oregon and Timothy Cheney of Gig Harbor, Washington will lose their pilot’s licenses because of the incident .

Recently in Washington DC, the National Transportation Safety Board held a summit on distracted driving which addressed the dangers of text-messaging and using other electronic devices while driving. The summit revealed data that said almost 6,000 people were killed and about 500,000 injured in motor vehicle accidents linked to driver distraction.

The National Transportation Safety Board has made recommendations to the Federal Aviation Agency, the U.S. Coast Guard and other governmental agencies regarding operator fatigue and a sleep disorder called sleep apnea. The NTSB presented “Fatigue and Sleep Disorders in Transportation Accidents” at the Washington D.C. Sleep Society and their data reveals that fatigue and sleep apnea has been a factor in thousands of transportation accidents since 1967 including railroad, marine, intermodal, highway, and aviation.

seattle motor vehicle accident attorneyThe NTSB recommends that pilots and other operators or motor vehicles be evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea if they have other risk factors for that disorder.

Sleep apnea is a disorder in which a person has pauses in their breathing during a sleep cycle. Each episode is termed apnea, and it means “failure to breath.” When people have the condition, their breathing is obstructed during the night which affects their body, causing daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

The Seattle Times reports that a man was hit and killed by an Amtrak train while walking on a railroad trestle over the Lewis River south of Woodland on Friday afternoon. This is the ninth pedestrian accident involving a train in Washington so far this year.

The train was traveling from Seattle to Vancouver on the BNSF Railway.

Apparently the man and a companion were on the trestle looking for a place to swim.

The Seattle Times reports that a woman, who was in her early 20s, was hit and killed by a Union Pacific freight train traveling on Burlington Northern tracks near the Tacoma late Friday evening.

The Portland-bound freight train was near the Black River Station at the time of the pedestrian accident.

According to the report, this is the fifth pedestrian who has been killed on Burlington Northern property in 2009. In 2008, 16 people were killed.


This information is provided by Washington Injury Attorney blog, a service of The Farber law Group. We represent pedestrian accident victims and their families.