Nestlé’s Nesquik recalled due to possible salmonella contamination

I must admit that my son was a Nesquik addict. He had to have his fix of Nesquik upon waking every morning or else he would have a meltdown. With this daily habit of chocolate milk in the morning, and sometimes at bed time, we often joked that we should buy stock in Nestlé because we practically bought Nesquik in bulk. It was like toilet paper in our house, a product we would never let ourselves run out of.

salmonella lawyerSo, it was a concern this morning when we saw that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration along with Nestlé corporation has issued a recall for Nesquik chocolate milk powder for possible salmonella contamination.

Nestlé says that products being recalled are packaged in a 40.7 oz, 21.8 oz or 10.9 oz size with an expiration date of October 2014.

The concern is that the calcium carbonate, one ingredient in the product, has been recalled by it’s supplier, Omya Inc.

Nestlé says that no salmonella illnesses have been linked to the powder but consumers should dispose of the product or return it to the distributor for a refund.

Salmonella infection can cause severe diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever which can develop from eight to 72 hours of consuming a contaminated food. The illness can can be life threatening to infants, small children, older people and those with weakened immune symptoms.

This information is provided by Washington Injury Attorney blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have become seriously ill due to foodborne illness and the family of those who have died. With our help, you may be able to recover compensation for your damages including medical costs.

Contact The Farber Law Group at 1-800-244-9087 or attorney@hgfarber.com to schedule a free and confidential case evaluation. Our Bellevue office is here to assist you.

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