FDA may move to lower acetaminophen doses because of link to liver damage and failure

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) says that acetaminophen, an ingredient in the leading painkillers, is the number one cause of liver failure in the United States. According to an FDA report, nearly 56,000 Americans go to the Emergency Room each year and 200 die because of acetaminophen over doses.

The FDA is working reduce acetaminophen overdoses and an advisory panel that the FDA assembled recommends taking Vicodin and Percocet off the market and lowering the prescribed dosages of over-the-counter medications containing acetaminophen.

Acetaminophen is an ingredient in the leading pain killers on the market today including Tyleonol, Extra Strength Tylenol, Excedrin, TheraFlu and Nyquill. When taken in amounts greater than the recommended dosage, the liver cannot metabolize it and liver damage is a likely result. Some poison control centers say that acetaminophen overdoses are their number one calls.

If you or a loved overdoses on acetaminophen, you should go to an emergency room immediately. There are several treatments available: stomach pumping, activated charcoal or drugs to neutralize the acetaminophen. Poison control centers do not recommend the inducement of vomiting or drinking lots of water.

You should call an experienced personal injury attorney if acetaminophen caused your liver disease. Contact The Farber Law Group for a confidential and free case evaluation.

If you or a loved has liver damage due an acetaminophen overdose, you should contact a personal injury attorney to help determine

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0 responses to “FDA may move to lower acetaminophen doses because of link to liver damage and failure”

  1. Vicodin struck me as familiar and then I remember that the TV series Dr. House has advertised for it a lot the last season. I didn’t know that FDA recommended to take it of the market. They should say in the show that it causes liver failure along with the well known addiction.

  2. Brad Minyard says:

    Whenever I hear the word vicodin, I always think of Brett Favre going into rehab the year the Packers won the Super Bowl.