Woman awarded $6.4 Million in ‘failure to diagnose’ malpractice lawsuit

A Blackstone, Massachusetts woman was awarded $6.4 million in a medical malpractice suit stemming from a stroke she had due to her physician failing to diagnose pre-eclampsia during her pregnancy. This is the largest settlement of its kind in Worcester County.

In her lawsuit, Kimberly Monson claimed that Dr. Elizabeth Konig and Dedham Medical Associates were guilty of medical malpractice for failing to diagnose and treat her pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia is a condition of pregnancy that develops in some women between the 20th week of gestation and delivery. Symptoms include high blood pressure (hypertension) and significant amounts of protein in the urine. Pre-eclampsia is a potentially fatal condition.

Monson was able to deliver her baby safely but her stroke left her with permanent brain damage and she is so disabled that she is unable to care for her young children. She has permanent vision damage, short-term memory loss, dizziness, poor balance and weakness in her extremities.

In a report by The Milford Daily News, a letter by Dr. Ronald J. Foote claiming that Monson’s doctor, “”deviated from the accepted standard of medical care and … failed to provide proper treatment” was included in court documents. Dr. Foote maintained that if Monson received a timely diagnosis and proper treatment she would not have suffered such severe and permanent brain damage.

The final award, with interest to Monson, is $10 million which should help provide for her future medical care and compensates her for pain and suffering.

This information is provided by Washington Injury Attorney blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have serious injuries due to medical malpractice including obstetrics and birth injury malpractice which resulted in injury to either mother or baby.

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